Using Multiple Pre-Shared Keys with OpenBSD ISAKMPD

by on Jan.02, 2006, under OpenBSD

Having an Open Source IPSec VPN into the office is nifty. It usually also means others will want to appreciate it’s niftiness… (and use your bandwidth to check their Exchange calendars). So, do you want 30 or so other users out there with their perpetually un-locked, spyware and virus-vulnerable XtraPenetrable laptops, holding the only pre-shared key to your VPN? Of course not. (you really don’t). So, implement one pre-shared key per user, or one key per group, depending on your policy of access revocation.
We really like OpenBSD around here, and may sound like men with a hammer thinking everything is a nail, but it really does do *everything* well as far as we use it. So here’s the setup.

First, you must create the config files for ISAKMPD.

$ sudo touch /etc/isakmpd/isakmpd.conf
$ sudo touch /etc/isakmpd/isakmpd.policy

Then, turn on the AH and ESP protocols by editing the /etc/sysctl.conf.
net.inet.esp.enable=1 # 0=Disable the ESP IPsec protocol
net.inet.ah.enable=1 # 0=Disable the AH IPsec protocol

Or, just do it from the shell-
$ sudo su
# sysctl -w net.inet.esp.enable=1
# sysctl -w net.inet.ah.enable=1

Now, we’ll set up a basic road-warrior configuration in /etc/isakmpd/isakmpd.conf .
Here’s an example.
Next, we’ll set up the multiple pre-shared keys in the policy file.
Here’s another example.
After we edit these files, you’ll need to change the permissions on them.

$ sudo su
# chmod 0500 /etc/isakmpd/isakmpd.conf /etc/isakmpd/isakmpd.policy

Now allow the VPN traffic through your packet filter-
Here’s another example.

Apply the new packet filter configuration:
# pfctl -f /etc/pf.conf -F all -d -e

Fire up ISAKMPD in debug mode so you can see any incoming connections

$ sudo su
# isakmpd -d -DA=75

Once your road-warrior connects successfully, kill the debug mode ISAKMPD and start it in normal daemon mode.
$ sudo su
# pkill -9 isakmpd && isakmpd

Now, connect a road-warrior machine to the outside of your firewall, and check for your security associations.

$ sudo su
# ipsecadm show

If you have a valid VPN connection, you should see something like this:

sadb_dump: satype esp vers 2 len 40 seq 0 pid 0
sa: spi 0x80655c1b auth hmac-sha1 enc 3des-cbc
state larval replay 0 flags 4
lifetime_cur: alloc 0 bytes 0 add 1136234418 first 0
lifetime_soft: alloc 0 bytes 0 add 0 first 0
lifetime_hard: alloc 0 bytes 0 add 28800 first 0
address_src: 192.168.245.2
address_dst: 192.168.209.2
identity_src: type prefix id 0: 192.168.245.2/32
identity_dst: type prefix id 0: 192.168.209.2/32
key_auth: bits 160: 9dfde94cd9708d6a995a4d238
key_encrypt: bits 192: 3bc2f3f7f0fbce8a12ae73966c5
sadb_dump: satype esp vers 2 len 40 seq 0 pid 0
sa: spi 0x895dcf4b auth hmac-sha1 enc 3des-cbc
state larval replay 0 flags 4
lifetime_cur: alloc 0 bytes 0 add 1136261627 first 0
lifetime_soft: alloc 0 bytes 0 add 25920 first 0
lifetime_hard: alloc 0 bytes 0 add 28800 first 0
addres_src: 192.168.245.2
addres_dst: 192.168.209.2
identity_src: type prefix id 0: 192.168.245.2/32
identity_dst: type prefix id 0: 192.168.209.2/32
key_auth: bits 160: 9d8c52703983b1497b655a9
key_encrypt: bits 192: 39875c4b8fd77ec740f37da27d

You can also check the VPN connections with netstat-

$ sudo su
# netstat -rn

Should output something like this-

Encap:
Source Port Destination Port Proto SA(Address/Proto/Type/Direction)
192.168.0/24 0 192.168.10/24 0 0 192.168.245.2/50/use/in
192.168.10/24 0 192.168.0/24 0 0 192.168.209.2/50/require/out

I realise this is short, (I wasn’t paid to write this book) ;) so please feel free to post any questions or comments.

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